Earth Day and Revelation 5
2010-04-14 by David von Schlichten

Our second reading for this Sunday speaks of all creation singing praise to God. The passage makes everyone equal; there is no hierarchy in this choir. Everyone is singing, humans and non-humans alike. The passage is egalitarian and inclusive. Christ is risen!

Yours in Christ,

David von Schlichten, Lectionary Blog Moderator





Reflections on an Eco-hermeneutic for Preaching
2010-04-13 by Leah D. Schade

Lucy Atkinson Rose in her book, Sharing the Word: Preaching in the Roundtable Church, suggests "conversational preaching” as a way to gather the voices around the homiletic table that have been particularly overlooked, ignored or suppressed.  I believe that one of those voices that has been missing, silenced and disregarded in the pulpit is that of Earth itself.   I propose Earth as one of those conversation partners around the homiletic roundtable. 

There has been a disconnect between humanity and God's creation.  Human beings are alienated from the soil, water, flora and fauna of the planet we share.  A rupture in the relationship has divorced us from those with whom we share this oikos.  Preachers can become vital partners in repairing this rupture and rebuilding the relationship.  I assert that the fields of ecology, environmental justice, and ecofeminist liberation theology are profound sources of insights for preaching.  How can Earth help set the church's agenda?  How can the life-restoring Earth, which has been excluded and silenced, be valued and invited into the conversation?      

Re-listening to Scripture with ears tuned to the voice of Earth is a way to begin that task.  The eco-minded preacher must include an eco-hermeneutic when reading scripture. When you are approaching texts for a sermon (and this goes for any Sunday – not just Earth Day), ask yourself, “How might Earth hear this text?  What in this text might be ‘good news’ to Earth?  Or could this text be interpreted in a way that is oppressive to Earth?  What is God doing in this text that is liberative for both the human and non-human members of the Earth community?”  Viewing the Bible through a "green lens" brings into the preacher's study resources that expand upon traditional biblical scholarship so that the words themselves may open themselves in their fullness and allow the Gospel to be proclaimed to Earth and all of Earth’s inhabitants. 





Ecocriticism/Ecofeminism and Earth Day
2010-04-12 by David von Schlichten

As I work on my PhD in English, one area of special interest for me is ecocriticism, which examines texts in light of the hierarchical binaries that place humans and "civilization" as superior to non-human creatures and nature in general. Ecocriticism challenges these binaries with non-hierarchical, egalitarian modes of thinking.

Ecofeminism sees striking overlaps between this hierarchical, anthropocentric view toward nature and the hierarchical, androcentric view toward women that is prevalent in patriarchal societies. These two paradigms complement each other in deleterious ways. Ecofeminism challenges these paradigms with an egalitarian, non-hiearchical understanding.

Applying all this to theology in general and preaching in particular  can be challenging, since Christianity itself contains some hierarchical, binary thinking. Nevertheless, several theologians and preachers have been successful in showing how one can be, say, a devout ecofeminist Christian.

How might you preach this Sunday along these lines?

Yours in Christ,

David von Schlichten, Lectionary Blog Moderator





Devouting Thomas
2010-04-09 by David von Schlichten

In John 11, when Jesus says that they should all travel to the Bethany area so Jesus can raise Lazarus from the dead, Thomas does not understand Jesus. Thomas thinks Jesus is heading to his own death - of course, in a way, Jesus is doing just that. In any case, Thomas then declares, "Let us also go, that we may die with him." In other words, Thomas expresses a willingness to die with Jesus. In John 11, at least, Thomas is devout, not full of doubt.

Yours in Christ,

David von Schlichten, Lectionary Blog Moderator





Vote on Seminarian Sermon
2010-04-07 by David Howell

The voting for GoodPreacher Seminarian Sermon Award is in the final stage. Many students submitted sermons, and two sermons received the most votes on our website.
These two sermons are now in YouTube format. Please experience the sermons and vote. The one that receives the most votes receives a complimentary registration to the
Festival of Homiletics, a free room, and $200 in expense money.

Premium Goods
By Donna Olivia Powell

Part 1

Good News or Bad News?
By Sarah Pomerantz

Part 1

Part 2

Vote on the sermons above

email office@goodpreacher.com for password needed for voting





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