walking with lepers
2010-10-08 by scarlet Gorton

What are we to take home today?

is the lesson here to be thankful?

is it to accept others who are not like us

is it  to show  mercy to all like Jesus did

is it to pray in one voice?

is it about the miracle of healing

yes – it’s all of the above

it’s like a parable

where we can have many lessons

So the one I personally am taking home today is the one about walking together with lepers.

It probably wasn’t too hard once the 9 Israelites were afflicted with leprosy to walk side by side with the Samaritan leper. Visibly on the outside they were the same. They shared a common disease.

There is a great need for Christians to look at the inside and see what we have in common. We each have hearts that break and souls that yearn and we all suffer and have needs. We all need hope to get us through life. We must get out of our comfort zone and walk with the lepers of today and call out with them for help.

When the 10 called out to Jesus it wasn’t because all 10 knew Him as God. Actually none of them did. And from our text the only one who knew Jesus as Lord afterward was the Samaritan, the foreigner.

So what I see in this story, What I am taking home today is the necessity for us to walk side by side  

Calling out to Jesus together with the lepers and the foreigners of today.

Recognizing that we are all in need of Jesus’ healing.

I am taking home an understanding that we need to walk the border of Galilee and Samaria as we travel to Jerusalem.

I am taking home the idea that we can learn how to respond from the leper and that we need one another.

Who do the lepers represent for you?

Who do you need to walk with today?

The unbeliever?

The homosexual?

The addict?

The mentally ill?

Who does the foreigner represent to you?

Let’s not wait for illness or tragedy to bring us together.

That’s what I’m taking home today.

It is not an easy message but I hope we can all see the need and respond.





Faith at the Borders
2010-10-06 by Stephen Schuette

Interesting things happen along borders where differences meet.  Just some observations…  How do you approach someone while at the same time “keeping their distance?”  There are obvious custom boundaries at work here too influenced by purity laws.  The one who is made clean and returns carries many I.D.’s.  He’s first a leper, an all-consuming identity.  Then he’s a leper made clean, Samaritan, foreigner, and finally one whose faith has made him well.  Is the suggestion of the story that this final ID overcomes all the others which separate and divide and focus on borders?

There seems a connection with Timothy and “wrangling over words” as the source of many false borders.

And what do we say of borders today, those places where differences collide and persons encounter each other?   This could be the physical borders between the US and Mexico, the 39th parallel or the waters around the Koreas, or between Israel and Gaza.  Or it could be the borders between city and suburb or the non-physical borders between white collar and blue collar or Republican and Democrat or white and black.

It’s common to feel uneasy around borders (which may be the reason there are borders in the first place?).  But I was intrigued by the Time Magazine article this week entitled The Laughing Bishop.  Desmond Tutu seems to have an ability to turn the table of that uneasiness away from doubt and pass the dis-ease back to the enforcers of the borders who bear the responsibility for it.  He was able to come into crowds and persuade both armed police and protesters to walk away.  How?  By faith!  (See Time, Oct. 11, p. 42)  Borders are powerful.  Do we believe our faith is powerful?





Un-Other Sunday; Love One Another: Un-Other One Another
2010-10-04 by David von Schlichten

To treat someone as Other is to treat that person with prejudice and to regard that person as inferior to yourself. Given the almost-Qur'an-burning and teens being bullied into suicide, I decided that this Sunday will be Un-Other Sunday.

To commemorate the day, I will peform a one-person play based on Jonah, a book which deals well with the issue of un-othering. We will also take up a collection for our local suicide prevention organization.

I invite my fellow preachers to preach this Sunday on loving one another by un-othering one another. Both the Naaman story and the gospel from Luke about the ten lepers address un-othering.

Yours in Christ,

David von Schlichten, Lectionary Blog Moderator





Thanks!
2010-10-04 by David Howell

to

David von Schlichten

and 

Rick Brand 

for posting their sermons this week in

Sermon Feedback Cafe


 

 





Ain't it Awful?
2010-10-01 by David Howell

Ain't it Awful?
By Richard Brand

is in

Sermon Feedback Cafe





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