More Blinking Nuance
2009-03-19 by Michael Ruffin

This question was submitted via email:  "With regards to the light and the blinking, two other considerations are in play in the human eye. How bright the light is and how long one has been in the dark (or how suddenly the light appears.) At least those conditions affect the way I respond to light. Would they add dimensions to your thoughts?"

Indeed, I think they do.  They add a helpful take on what I've been thinking about.

When you start playing with this whole light and dark thing that's so important to John, the possible accompanying images seem boundless.

Thanks!





To a T
2009-03-19 by David von Schlichten

Michael,

I like those suggestions quite a bit. I may use them. Hmmm.

I also appreciate your distinction between humility and timidity. Wise.

Thankful, I am

Yours in Christ,

David von Schlichten, Lectionary Blog Moderator






2009-03-18 by Michael Ruffin

David,

Would you be willing to use two "t" words?

If so, you might consider "timidity" and "temerity," which are antonyms.

Could you say that while humility is required, timidity is not; that while faith is required, temerity is not?

It might work.





T and Blinking
2009-03-18 by David von Schlichten

Michael Ruffin is our guest blogger, and he offers elucidating insights about approaching light and blinking. Approaching the Light does indeed call for humility. Scroll down to read his posts.

I recall Plato's Allegory of the Cave, in which we are all facing the shadows of reality, and we are to strive to be free to enter the daylight to see things as they are. That process, however, is challenging, even painful and frightening.

I am doing a sermon series for Sundays on the word "WAIT." This Sunday I am to focus on a word that begins with T, the last letter in the word. Does anyone have a suggestion for a T word that pertains to waiting and approaching the Light?

Yours in Christ,

David von Schlichten, Lectionary Blog Moderator 





Blinking in the Light
2009-03-18 by Michael Ruffin

My Lent sermon series this year is "On the Road to the Cross"; I have decided to entitle this week's sermon "Blinking in the Light."

I had at first intended to entitle it "Walking in the Light" but I wound up not feeling that confident.

I arrived at my title through reflection on the very complicated nature of the Gospel lection. John 3:14-21, especially when viewed in relation to the other lectionary texts, has led me to ponder the inherent difficulties that can exist in (1) believing in Jesus Christ and (2) understanding how we come to believe in Jesus Christ.

In the Numbers text to which the Gospel text refers, the people are healed of the serpent bites when they look at the bronze serpent mounted on a pole by Moses.  It is in looking upon it that they were healed.  In my imagination I can see people who refused to look at the bronze serpent and thus get healed.  Why do people do things like that?  When given the opportunity to look, what causes people to blink?  I'm thinking of the child's game of having a stare down contest; who will blink first (it was always me, by the way)?  If "looking" upon the crucified Christ and believing in him brings eternal life, why do so many people blink?

Or is blinking the natural response to something so dazzling? Perhaps we have to blink to get past the brightness; perhaps we have to blink to get past our incredulity; perhaps we have to blink all through life as we deal with our doubts and our fears.

Then there is the part of the text about people loving darkness rather than light because they don't want their deeds exposed.  Again, I am drawn to the idea of blinking because that's what bright light can cause us to do. 

Perhaps the light is something that must be approached with great humility.  I can imagine few people running full-bore, eyes open, into the light.  On the other hand, people who screw their eyes shut against the light will not find eternal life.  Maybe the best we can do--and maybe the best we can encourage--is to step tenatively into the light, eyes blinking furiously, partly trying to avoid and partly trying to let it in. 

 





[First Page] [Prev] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 [Next] [Last Page]

Login - (This login is for administrators and bloggers. Usernames and passwords for GoodPreacher subscribers will not work here.)